The First World War in 3D: A Stereoscopic Collection

The Somerset Remembers project was recently given a collection of stereoscopic photographs from a lady whose father was in the 1st Battalion The Somerset Light Infantry.

A Stereoscope from the museum collection with one of the postcards. The two images in the photo combine to create one through the lenses providing the viewer with an image with a 3D effect

A Stereoscope from the museum collection with one of the postcards. The two images in the photo when viewed through the lenses combine to create an image with a 3D effect.

These fascinating images entitled ‘The Battle Field Series’ were produced by the Weston- Super-Mare company George Nightingale & Co. The pictures depict various scenes of the immediate post-war landscape in France and Belgium. They often feature people interacting or observing their surroundings. On the reverse of each postcard is a brief description of the location or a more explanatory piece of text.

On reverse: No.20. Hooge Crater Cemetery. In the War zone there are 1,700 new cemeteries. This particular one contains over 11,000 graves, details of each one being carefully indexed by the Graves Committees. Notice the duckboards.

No.20. Hooge Crater Cemetery. In the War zone there are 1,700 new cemeteries. This particular one contains over 11,000 graves, details of each one being carefully indexed by the Graves Committees. Notice the duckboards.

 

No.18. Captured guns at Arras. Various types of German guns are shown here.

No.18. Captured guns at Arras. Various types of German guns are shown here.

 

No.11 British Cemetery Couzecourt.

No.11 British Cemetery Couzecourt.

It has been suggested by the author of The Great War in 3D, that the George Nightingale & Co. may have been set up to provide employment to ex-servicemen due to the timing and nature of the photographs. It is also noted on the reverse of each picture that the ‘Photos are finished and printed entirely by Ex-servicemen at Reflex Studios, Parkstone’ in Dorset.

parkstone

Further information about the use of stereoscopic images can be found here:

www.nationalmediamuseum.org.uk/collection/photography

www.smith.edu/artmuseum/Collections

 

 

 

 

 

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